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  Dec 14, 2017
 
2016-2017 Graduate Studies Bulletin (Archived Copy) [Archived Catalog]

Education Administration, Ph.D.



The Ph.D. degree is offered in two program emphases: higher education administration and CD-12 education administration. Each prepares students for a variety of leadership positions in institutions and agencies related to the emphasis of their studies. Those earning the degree serve as university administrators, school superintendents and principals, administrators in school districts and government agencies, college and university faculty, and other related leadership capacities.

Learning Outcomes

CD-12 Track

  • Cultural Competence. Advanced program candidates demonstrate a high level of competence in understanding and responding to diversity of culture, language, and ethnicity.
  • Knowledge and Application of Ethical Principles. Advanced program candidates demonstrate in-depth knowledge and thoughtful application of the Code of Ethical Conduct and other guidelines relevant to their professional role
  • Communication Skills. Advanced program candidates possess a high level of oral, written, and technological communication skills, with specialization for the specific professional role(s) emphasized in the program. For programs for the advanced preparation of teachers, candidates meet ISTE standards. For doctoral programs, candidates are prepared to publish and present at conferences.
  • Mastery of Relevant Theory and Research. Advanced program candidates demonstrate in-depth, critical knowledge of the theory and research relevant to the professional role(s) and focus area(s) emphasized in the program.
  • Skills in Identifying and Using Professional Resources. Advanced program candidates demonstrate a high level of skill in identifying and using the human, material, and technological resources needed to perform their professional roles and to keep abreast of the field’s changing knowledge base.
  • Inquiry Skills and Knowledge of Research Methods. Using systematic and professionally accepted approaches, advanced program candidates demonstrate inquiry skills, showing their ability to investigate questions relevant to their practice and professional goals.
  • Skills in Collaborating, Teaching, and/or Mentoring. Advanced program candidates demonstrate the flexible, varied skills needed to work collaboratively and effectively with other adults in professional roles.
  • Advocacy Skills. Advanced program candidates demonstrate competence in articulating and advocating for sound professional practices and public policies for the positive development and learning of all students.
  • Leadership Skills. Advanced program candidates reflect on and use their abilities and opportunities to think strategically, build consensus, create change, and influence better outcomes for students, families, and the profession.
  • Program Evaluation in Educational Leadership. Students enrolled in the PhD in Educational Leadership (CD-12 emphasis) demonstrate in-depth knowledge of methodologies for program evaluation and possess ethical leadership that is characterized by appreciation of diversity of perspective and approach.
  • Application of Research Paradigms in Educational Leadership: Students enrolled in the PhD in Educational Leadership (CD-12 emphasis) demonstrate an awareness, understanding and application of multiple research methodologies that align with differing types of research questions.
  • Application of Original Research in Educational Leadership: Students enrolled in the PhD in Educational Leadership (CD-12 emphasis) generate original research questions, apply appropriate research methodologies, and present findings of the independent research.

Higher Education Track

  • Cultural Competence. Advanced program candidates demonstrate a high level of competence in understanding and responding to diversity of culture, language, and ethnicity.
  • Knowledge and Application of Ethical Principles. Advanced program candidates demonstrate in-depth knowledge and thoughtful application of the Code of Ethical Conduct and other guidelines relevant to their professional role.
  • Communication Skills. Advanced program candidates possess a high level of oral, written, and technological communication skills, with specialization for the specific professional role(s) emphasized in the program. For programs for the advanced preparation of teachers, candidates meet ISTE standards. For doctoral programs, candidates are prepared to publish and present at conferences.
  • Mastery of Relevant Theory and Research. Advanced program candidates demonstrate in-depth, critical knowledge of the theory and research relevant to the professional role(s) and focus area(s) emphasized in the program.
  • Skills in Identifying and Using Professional Resources. Advanced program candidates demonstrate a high level of skill in identifying and using the human, material, and technological resources needed to perform their professional roles and to keep abreast of the field’s changing knowledge base.
  • Inquiry Skills and Knowledge of Research Methods. Using systematic and professionally accepted approaches, advanced program candidates demonstrate inquiry skills, showing their ability to investigate questions relevant to their practice and professional goals.
  • Skills in Collaborating, Teaching, and/or Mentoring. Advanced program candidates demonstrate the flexible, varied skills needed to work collaboratively and effectively with other adults in professional roles.
  • Advocacy Skills. Advanced program candidates demonstrate competence in articulating and advocating for sound professional practices and public policies for the positive development and learning of all students.
  • Leadership Skills. Advanced program candidates reflect on and use their abilities and opportunities to think strategically, build consensus, create change, and influence better outcomes for students, families, and the profession.
  • Knowledge of current theories and models of institutional organization, administration, and governance.
  • Knowledge of legal research, constitutional provisions, statutory laws, course decisions, and regulations as they affect administration of higher education.

Admission

Applicants must complete the Graduate School application. 

Degree Requirements (69 Post Masters Hours)

Education Administration/CD-12 (Ph.D.)


The application deadlines is Feb. 1.

1. Total hours required:


69 hours beyond the master’s degree, the last 30 of which must be completed no more than eight years prior to graduation.

2. Qualifying examination:


A writing sample, as one part of a three-part interview process, serves as the qualifying examination.

3. Courses:


Course work is designed to ensure that at the completion of the program the student can demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and dispositions developed in the following course work:

Area 1:


33 hours of courses leading to superintendency certification or its equivalent.

B. Cognate (9 Hours)


9 hours in an identified cognate area outside the Department of Educational Leadership and Policies. These courses are to be determined by the student’s program advisory committee.

C. Research Course (3 Hours)


3 hours of research beyond master’s level/introduction course.

Notes:


Students who have successfully completed a program leading to superintendency certification from another regionally accredited institution may be given credit for up to 33 hours in Area 1, subject to approval of the Program Advisory Committee.

Candidates pursuing a Ph.D. in CD-12 Education Administration to attain professional goals not requiring educational administrator certification (i.e., professorate, private school leader) are required to complete 69 hours beyond the master’s. In these cases, courses that support the candidate’s professional goals my be substituted in Area 1, subject to the approval of the Program Advisory Committee.

Area 2:


9 hours of seminar courses including:

Area 3:


9 hours of post-master’s 700- and 800-level courses (not to include the cognate) within the field of education, but outside the CD-12 education administration program. Must include a research course.

Area 4:


18 hours in courses to prepare the student for the dissertation, to include:

4. Foreign Language:


To qualify for the Ph.D. degree, a candidate must demonstrate one of the following: a reading knowledge of one foreign language, a knowledge of the use of computers, or competency in statistics. The language selected for the degree program must be approved by the College of Education and The Graduate School. Satisfactory completion of the foreign language option will be verified by a foreign language 315 (intensive readings) course or through an examination administered by the Department of Foreign Languages and Literature. The student’s Program Advisory Committee will determine the manner in which the statistics and computer knowledge options will be demonstrated but may include completion of appropriate cognate course work or examinations. The language requirement must be completed at least one academic year prior to graduation.

5. Comprehensive examination:


The comprehensive examination for the Ph.D. degree includes a written examination of nine hours usually over two days and an oral examination.

6. Dissertation:


Every candidate for a doctoral degree is required to successfully complete and defend a dissertation. Prior to preparing a dissertation, a proposal is required. The dissertation proposal must be approved by the student’s Dissertation Committee. The degree candidate must successfully defend the dissertation before his or her Dissertation Oral Examination Committee.

Education Administration/Higher Education (Ph.D.)


1. Total hours required:


81 hours beyond the baccalaureate degree, at least 30 of which must be completed no more than eight years prior to graduation.

2. Qualifying examination:


Writing sample

3. Courses:


The student’s Program Advisory Committee will evaluate previous course work and experiences and recommend appropriate courses to ensure that at the completion of the program that student can demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and dispositions typically developed in the following course work:

Area 2:


9 hours of elective courses related to higher education.

Area 3:


18 hours in a cognate area comprising: A single content area that can prepare the student for teaching at the baccalaureate level in an academic discipline or applied field drawn from: arts and humanities, social and behavioral sciences, natural sciences, mathematics, or professional fields.

Area 4:


9 hours of foundational course work in education comprising: courses at the 700 and 800 levels within the College of Education but outside the Department of Educational Leadership and Policies, excluding cognate courses.

Area 5:


21 hours of course work in educational research:

A. 6 hours of research methods courses that must focus on either quantitative or qualitative methodology.


B. 3 additional hours of research course work as approved by the advisor.


4. Comprehensive examination:


The comprehensive examination for the Ph.D. degree includes a written examination over two days and an oral examination.